From the HBD Archive
From: arf@ddsw1.mcs.com (Jack Schmidling)
Subject: Sparging, Wyeast, Malting
Date: 1992-03-19 03:02:00 GMT


To: Homebrew Digest
Fm: Jack Schmidling

>From: mcnally@wsl.dec.com
>Subject: Sparge water temperature


>Jack S. offers advice that boiling sparge water is more effective than
the traditional 170 degree water. Though I haven't experimented
personally with this, my understanding is that for decoction mash
brewers like Jack (I think? correct me if I'm wrong)

I am no longer doing decoction.

> For infusion brewers, however, it seems to me that there might be
increased risk of rinsing unconverted starches into the wort.

My point is NOT that boiling water is the ideal sparge temp but that no
matter what the sparge temp is, the mash itself never sees anything close to
what is going in.

Next time you do a sparge, run a thermomenter up and down the lauter tun to
determine the actual temp profile. With boiling water going in, I get a
range of 135F coming out to 155F near the top. Matters can only get worse
using water at the "correct" temp.

Bear in mind that I am not dumping in a large volume of boiling sparge water.
I am only running it in at the rate the sweet wort is running out. I
maintain about an inch over the grain and the heat loss is what is at issue
here, not brewing theory.

>Another issue is the effect on polyphenol extraction. Jack: Do you
test the pH of the last runnings out of your lauter tun?

No.

>Do you taste it?

Of course.

>My general rule is that I quit sparging when the runoff starts
tasting like tea.

That is a bit subjective.

>That seems to be about the time the pH goes above
about 5.6.

According to Noonan, the the issue is change in pH, not the absolute value.
He also contends the SG is a good indication of when to quit and suggests
that 1.008 should be the limit. I stop at 1.010 to allow a margin for error.

>From: gummitch@techbook.com (Jeff Frane)

>Yo. The answer is yes. And why not, indeed?

Yes, what and why not what?

Just for the record, the question is: Where is the yeast? In the inner or
outer container?

Yes is not very satisfying.

>From: mfetzer@ucsd.edu (The Rider)

>Jack Writes:
>> It's great fun, very rewarding and easy to do in small quantities. I
> demonstrate the process and how to make the necessary equipment in my video.
> Perhaps one of the "reviewers" out there, who received a free copy would be
> kind enough to send it on to you.

>Jeez Jack, I don't suppose you're talking about *me* are you? I did review
the bloody thing,......

Thank you but you seem to have missed the point. If you are through with it
and it is sitting around collecting dust, why not send it on to someone else
who could use it?

>The section on malting was not necessary.....

That is a strange comment, considering that the poster was looking for
information on doing his own malting.

> and that guy at Baderbraeu (who can't pronounce the name
of his own brewery) had better be paying you big bucks for the
advertisement. *grin*

I had to settle for a case of beer.

BTW, I am not sure what he is mis-pronouncing but it is named after his sugar
daddy, a Mr Bader.


js


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