From the HBD Archive
From: SCHOENBERG@PPD.JSC.NASA.GOV
Subject: HBD Input
Date: 1992-03-25 15:16:13 GMT

In HBD #849, bgros@sensitivity.berkeley.edu (Bryan Gros) writes:

>I just bought 50 feet of 3/8 in O.D. copper tubing at the hardware
>store for $20. I plan to coil it for a wort chiller, but what do I
>do with the ends? Right now I think I'll put the coil in a bucket of
>ice water and run the hot wort through it into another bucket.

>So what do I do? do I just get some 3/8 in I.D. plastic tubing to put
>on both ends? If so, how do I start the siphon? If I attached some
>sort of mini-funnel to the start of the chiller, I could fill the
>plastic tube with water and stick one end in the boiling wort and one
>end in the funnel.

My brew buddy and I did the exact same thing for a wort chiller.
However, we put the copper coil into the hot wort (after sterilizing
of course) and run cold water through the inside of the coil. This
way the tough to clean part (i.e. the inside) never touches the wort.
We bought some clear plastic tubing and attached it to the copper
coil at both ends with small hose clamps. We bought a fitting from the
hardware store that fits into the kitchen spigot one one end and into
a standard garden hose connection on the other. The hose side fits
into a garden hose-to-plastic tubing adapter we got from a garden store.
We also took about two feet of coil off from the main coil and made a
small pre-chiller that we submerge in ice water to get the temperature
of the water below tap temperature. We connected the pre-chiller to
the main coil in the same manner using plastic tubing and hose clamps.
You have to be a little careful turning on the faucet so that the pressure
doesn't buildup too fast and blow the tubing off!

We have had absolutely incredibly good success with this design. We
can usually cool down 5 gallons of hot wort in less than 1/2 hour.
Hope this helps!

-rich schoenberg

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