From the HBD Archive
From: Dennis.Henderson@Eng.Sun.COM (Dennis Henderson)
Subject: Chiller-less cooling
Date: 1992-03-27 17:43:39 GMT

All this talk about fancy wort chillers has got me wondering (but still
relaxing) if my chilling method is too casual.

After the boil (malt extract and seperate hops) I have ~2.5 gallons of
wort. I put the stainless steel kettle in the sink in the garage.
I fill the sink up to the wort level and add six ice trays of ice cubes.
I stir the ice water every five minutes. After 15 minutes I dump the
water and repeat.

After less than 30 minutes the wort is down to 100 degress F. I combine
with 2.5 gallon of off-the-shelf "purified water" that has been in the
deep freeze for the brew session (~2 hours). The mixture is then
very close to 70 degrees F so I pitch. I don't use the blowoff method and
rack to a secondary after 2 to 5 days BTW.

My concerns:

1. The garage sink is not very clean. I do keep the lid on the kettle
at all times except when measuring the temperature.

2. Perhaps I should add the hot wort and cold water to the plastic
primary fermenter and pitch the next day when the mixture is down to
the correct temperature. Wouldn't this give more time for infection to
get into the beer before fermenting takes over.

3. An immersion chiller would take another large pot for sterilizing.
Or do folks pour the wort into the primary and boil the chiller in the
wort cook pot.

How silly am I being with my methods? I'm on my ~seventh batch and am
almost able to make a resonable tasing beer everytime. I'm concentrating
on getting a good process and experimenting with various recipes sold
at the local brew store before moving to more complicated methods.

...Dennis Henderson

Unsub:
> with 2.5 gallon of off-the-shelf "purified water" that has been in the
> very close to 70 degrees F so I pitch. I don't use the blowoff method and
> get into the beer before fermenting takes over.
> 3. An immersion chiller would take another large pot for sterilizing.

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