From the HBD Archive
From: ony@spss.com (Tony Babinec)
Subject: extract pale ale recipes
Date: 1992-04-14 15:29:05 GMT

Steve Davis is looking for pale ale recipes.

The first beer I brewed was a pale ale, and every 4 or 5 beers I
brewed since then was probably a pale ale! It's a great style.

Here are two recipes, assuming that you are an extract brewer and
have access to good ingredients. After all, good recipe + good
ingredients + good process = good beer! The English Pale Ale will
be somewhat in the style of Bass Ale, while the American Pale Ale
will be somewhat in the style of Sierra Nevada Pale Ale or Anchor
Liberty Ale.

English Pale Ale

4.5 pounds unhopped light dry malt extract
0.5 pounds dark crystal malt
0.5 pounds dark brown sugar

1 ounces English Kent Goldings 60 minutes before end of boil
0.5 ounces Fuggles 60 minutes before end of boil
0.5 ounces Fuggles 30 minutes before end of boil
0.5 ounces English Kent Goldings 10 minutes before end of boil
0.5 ounces English Kent Goldings 2 minutes before end of boil

dry Whitbred Ale or Munton-Fison ale yeast or
"Brewer's Choice" Wyeast "London" or "British" or "Irish" ale

1 teaspoon gypsum or "Burton Salts" added to boil water

Notice that the recipe calls for unhopped, light, dry malt extract.
Use unhopped extract because you're going to add your own hops.
Use light-colored extract because you're going to get some color
from the crystal malt. Use dry malt because you can measure it
out, unlike syrups. The crystal malt should be "cracked." Your
homebrew supply store can do that for you. Steep the crystal malt
for 30 minutes in your water at 150 degrees F. Then strain the
husks out, bring the water to boil, add the gypsum or salt, and add
the dry malt. After the wort has been boiling for 10 minutes, add
the first hops and follow the hop schedule indicated above. Hops
are English hops. Brown sugar can be added as soon as the boil
starts. If you use dry packaged yeast, use the above brands.
Others are lousy! Or, if you have access to Wyeast, use any of the
above yeasts. If you like the recipe, vary only the yeast, and you
get a somewhat different beer next time! Whitbred dry yeast and
Wyeast "British" ale are the same yeast.

American Pale Ale

5 pounds unhopped light dry malt extract
0.5 pounds dark crystal malt

1 ounce Cascade hops 60 minutes before end of boil
0.5 ounces Cascade hops 30 minutes before end of boil
0.5 ounces Cascade hops 10 minutes before end of boil
0.5 - 1 ounces Cascade hops "dry hopped"

Wyeast "American" Ale (this is Sierra Nevada's yeast!)

"Dry hopping" consists of adding hops not to the boil but after
boil and especially after fermentation. When your beer is done
fermenting, you must rack it into a second sanitized vessel,
preferably a glass carboy for which you have a fermentation lock.
The beer and the hops are both added to that second vessel, and the
beer is left from 1 to 3 weeks in the vessel. It isn't fermenting,
but it's picking up flavors from the hops. If you don't want to do
this, then instead of dry-hopping, add that last hop addition 2
minutes until end of boil. When you turn the flame off, let the
beer sit with the lid on for 20 minutes before chilling it and
racking it into the fermenter. But, I recommend that you try dry
hopping sooner or later, as it adds flavor and aroma that is just
right for this beer! English Pale Ale also benefits from dry
hopping.

Happy brewing!

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