From the HBD Archive
From: florianb@tekred.cna.tek.com
Subject: HB.DIG #261-Dry yeasts, cold fermentation.
Date: 1989-09-25 18:53:27 GMT

On the subject of reviving dry yeasts in warm water first.

Way back in the beginning, I used to revive my dry yeast this way. Then,
as time went on, I started just tossing it in the fermenter in dry form.
My wife has said on several occasions that my later brews were never as
good as the first few. The later ones having some sort of yeast bite.
Now I realize why this is. I'll bet a dime to a dollar it was because I
hadn't been reviving the yeast as I formerly did.

I don't worry about this anymore, as I am now using liquid yeast. I may
never go back to dry yeast except in emergency cases or in cases of sheer
laziness. The clean flavor of the liquid yeast cannot be approached with
dry yeast.

Greg Crawford asks:

>Also, could anyone tell me what effect fermenting at too cold a temp. would
>have. The yeast is a liquid german lager and the fermenting temp. is 40
>degrees. (This was before I bought my hunter energy monitor). The beer
>fermented to completion but there is a strange background flavor I can't put
>my finger on. Infection has crossed my mind but I have tried two beers like
>this with the same results while my ales fermented at 70 degrees have had no
>problem.

My guess is this. With the ales, the flavor masked the off flavors, if there
were any. Now, you are brewing a lager. Lagers are notorious for revealing
any imperfection in one's techniques. I'll wager you have a slight infection
of wild yeast or you are not cleaning your fermenters or equipment well
enough. In any case, 40 degrees should be good for the lager yeast.

Then Mike Meyer asks about Barleywine:

>mellowing in the bottle. (Plus, can anyone recommend an extract-based
>recipe -- some specialty grain is okay, but I sure don't want to mess with
>215 pounds of 2-row malt per 5-gallon batch...

What 215 lbs of grain?
Try using 10-12 lbs of plain light dried malt extract as the basis. Then
add 1 lb of 80L crystal, and even a bit of chockolate malt if you wish.
Some toasted malted barley would also be good. You may try 10 HBU's of
cascade, willamette, or other similar hops. Use plenty of flavoring hops
at the end.

[Florian Bell, waiting for the 1989 crop to get out of the drier]



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