From the HBD Archive
From: EISENHOFER@maven.dnet.EDA.Teradyne.COM (I was born in a desert, raised in a lion's den.)
Subject: Re: Calorie Content of HB
Date: 1992-05-11 13:59:50 GMT

>The other day after an exhusting hour of raquetball, I sat slumped against the
>wall nursing a Gatorade. Glancing at the "Contents" I noticed "Water, High
>Fuctose Corn Syrup, Dextrose......" and not much else. So this great
>sports drink is basically sugar water. Furthur, this 16 oz bottle contained
>100 calories. This got me thinking about the "beer belly". Would drinking
>a "Milwieser" Light with about 100 calories cause any more belly than the
>Gatorade I was currently drinking?

I recently read about a study in the Boston Globe (sorry, I can't cite
any more than this as I am doing it from memory) that found that alcohol
reduces the body's ability to burn fat. The study went on to say that
the body burned all the alcohol calories and all the carbohydrate
calories, while not burning all fat calories. A person drinking the
equivalent of three beers a day burned 1/3 less fat than the person
not consuming any alcohol, with similar dietary intake. The alcohol
was not beer, but I think that it is a safe extrapolation to assume
that beer would cause the same effect.

Thus, beer is not directly fattening, since all the calories in
beer are carbohydrate or alcohol calories. However, if you drink
beer, you should be more careful of your fat intake. (Which, for
me has been exactly my problem; when I drink a lot of beer, I tend
to go for the more fatty foods: sausgages, steaks, ice cream, etc :-)
This study, BTW, shows that lite beer is just as fattening as regular
beer (excepting for pychological effects: people drinking lite beer
are probably more likely to go for a less fattening meal). So,
eat well, exercise regularly, and party on! :-)

Karl

Karl Eisenhofer SPIKE eisenhofer@maven.dnet.teradyne.com
"Searchlight casting for faults in the clouds of delusion"


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