From the HBD Archive
From: korz@iepubj.att.com
Subject: Re: Wyeast datum
Date: 1992-06-02 15:53:00 GMT

Rob writes the following about Wyeast Belgian Ale yeast:
>The yeast is more attenuative than the Edme, Munton & Fison and
>Whitbread. It went from 1.052 to 1.013 in 5 days. With the same
>mash technique, a similar OG and one of the above dry yeasts, I
>would normally ferment out at 1.018-1.020 (consequently, my Belgian
>beer was a little over-hopped, but that kind of suits the style).
>
>The bad news: either I got a bad batch, or this stuff keeps fermenting
>for a long, long time, even at 70 degrees. By day 25, the yeast was
>still working away, the gravity was down to 1.010 and the aroma of
>bananas was unmistakable.

Aside:
First of all, I'd like to point out that I'm not at all affiliated
with Wyeast, other than being a satisfied customer.

It appears that too many Wyeast users blame the yeast for infections
rather than their sanitation techniques. I've been using Wyeast for
three years and have yet to have an infected batch since starting to
use Wyeast (except for one made with Munton & Fison Dry Yeast). The
four years of dry yeast brewing prior to that, had many infected
batches, but then again, I was less-skilled back then also.

I don't recall how long it took a recent Chimay-clone to ferment out
using Wyeast Belgian Ale yeast, but I think it may have been a bit longer
than most. The problem with the banana aroma is because you are
fermenting at too high a temperature. I forget who it was that posted
this phenomenon a few months ago (Martin maybe?) but I, foolishly, confirmed
it. My ferment was at a consistent 65F and *that* was too warm. The beer
turned out quite authentic except for the banana aroma. "Darn!" I said
to myself, and plan to soon try it again at 57F. The moral of the story
is:

Ferment Wyeast Belgian Ale yeast well below 65F,
unless you really like bananas.

Al.

Back New Search

The posts that comprise the Homebrew Digest Searchable Archive remain the property of their authors.
This search system is copyright © 2008 Scott Alfter; all rights reserved.