From the HBD Archive
From: Dances with Workstations <buchman@marva1.ENET.DEC.COM>
Subject: Re: Homebrew Digest #890 (May 28, 1992)
Date: 1992-06-12 16:25:47 GMT

Mark Easter is brewing a batch with:

> 4 oz cocoa powder
> 4 oz freshly ground coffee (Costa Rican)
> 1 cup unsulphered blackstrap mollases

That's a lot of strong flavors for one batch. I used two ounces of coffee
beans (unground) in 5 gallons of stout: the coffee was easily noticeable
(and good), but another ounce would be pushing it. Experience from others
on this digest says that 1/2 lb. would make your entire batch taste like
fermented coffee.

> From: Pat Lasswell <patl@microsoft.com>
> Subject: Re: Pumpernickel Porter Recipe
>
> I suspect that dry-hopping with coffee would destroy any head the beer
> might have, since (good) coffee contains a not insignificant amount of oil.
> . . . The activity of fermentation would probably flush out some of the
> aromatics, so it's anybody's guess as to what it would taste like. (Anybody
> done it?)

In the batch mentioned above, the two ounces of coffee beans were added when
the yeast was pitched. The stout develops a great head; head retention isn't
very good though. Coffee aroma is noticeable, and taste is pronounced.

> Now for a question. I've got a weizen in the secondary which I intended
> as a dunkelweizen, but it isn't as dunkel as I'd like. I'm considering
> steeping a couple ounces of black patent malt with my primings in hopes of
> adjusting the color at bottling time. Has anyone tried anything like this?
> Does it seem like a reasonable idea? Any drawbacks I should consider?
>
> Ooogy wawa,
> Dr. John

In a batch of bitter, I added black patent "tea" to darken the brew several
days before pitching and achieved the desired results. If you try to add it
at priming/bottling time, you'll have to decrease priming sugar to allow for
the extra fermentables in the bottle to avoid overcarbonation.
Cheers,
Jim Buchamn
buchman@marva1.enet.dec.com

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