From the HBD Archive
From: "MR. DAVID HABERMAN" <habermand@afal-edwards.af.mil>
Subject: Mammoth Lakes Brewing
Date: 1990-03-13 17:51:00 GMT

While we're on the subject of snow and skiing:

I recently spent a weekend skiing at Mammoth Mountain California and went to
the Mammoth Lakes Brewing Company at Brewhouse Grill a couple of times. They
serve their own Dogtown Ale (and amber beer) and Bodie Bold (a porter). I
found the beers a little swwet for my taste, although one of the owners says
that they sell a lot of the amber. The beers are made from Austraalian light
malt and Telford dark malt. They use only the extract in the boil, no adjunct
grains are added. I don't recall the bittering hops, but Cascade hops are
used for flavor. According to fellow Maltose Falcon Darryl Richman, the sweet
flavor may be due to low hop utilization due to the low temperature of the
boil at a high altitude (8,000 ft.). Not doing a full wort boil can also
under use the hops. They due a primary fermentation and then place it in the
serving tanks where the beer is primed and aged. There are no filters used
and the hot wort is run through a heat exchanger before going into the primary
fermentor. It is basically a giant version of what the beginning extract
brewer has at home. The beer was of good quality although I found them a
little lacking in body. Since I have been using adjunct grains in my home
brewing, I can tell the difference.

No brewpub is complete without food, and theirs is very good. They make their
own wurst and also serve excellent chili, chicken, hamburgers, and appetizers.
I think it is a worthwhile place to visit when in Mammoth.

Re beer in a water cooler:
Beer obtains its carbonation after priming by pressure either through capping
bottles or sealed in a keg. Putting it in a water cooler would not put
carbonation in the beer, it would just ferment away into the air.

David


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