From the HBD Archive
From: aem@mthvax.cs.miami.edu (a.e.mossberg)
Subject: Re: aluminium effects on restaurants
Date: 1989-05-27 15:27:09 GMT

In HOMEBREW Digest #161, Mike Fertsch sez:

>I went to my local restaurant-supply store today, looking for a kettle. I
>found stainless and aluminium, but no enameled steel. Based on the above
>discussion, I was surprised that restaurants use aluminium pots - do they
>get nasty flavors or Alzheimer's disease?

What a novel idea -- I've never considered the possibility of restaurants
getting Alzheimer's. I don't think they're susceptible, though.

>I've was told that enameled steel pots are not allowed in restaurants; the
>health authorities are afraid of chipped pots. I'm not sure if they are
>worried about the chips themselves, or the reaction of the exposed metal
>with the food. Either way, restaurants seem to have no problems using
>aluminium, but shy away from enamel because of health risks.

As I understand it, many cheap enamels contain lead. So the problem is
the chips themselves. No new enameled pots use lead-containing enamels.
As for aluminium, while the link has been rumoured for years, only recently
has data been available showing a correlation with high brain levels of
aluminium and senile dementia/alzheimer's, and the legal machinery moves
slowly and laboriously.

>Are our requirements that different from restaurants? My feeling is that
>they are so I'll look around some more for a 8 gallon enameled steel pot.

That's what I'd suggest. I think I saw some in the William's Homebrewing
catalogue, but any big department store should also have them.

aem
--
a.e.mossberg - aem@mthvax.miami.edu - aem@miavax.SPAN - aem@umiami.BITNET
Yo no tomo la guitarra por conseguir un aplauso. Yo canto la diferencia que
hay de lo cierto y lo falso. De lo contrario no canto. - Violeta Parra

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